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    About us

The Partnership for Dengue Control (PDC) was created in 2013 to spearhead an integrated approach to sustainably control and prevent dengue. A non-profit foundation, we seek to create synergies among the many new and innovative tools in the development pipeline to ensure the most effective control strategies.

As a member of the Global Dengue and Aedes-transmitted Diseases Consortium (GDAC), the PDC Foundation is contributing to a new paradigm for dengue control and other mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika, Chikungunya, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis.

A unique approach

The PDC Foundation brings together leading experts in the dengue-prevention community to address key issues with an overriding emphasis on combining vector control and vaccination strategies. We implement PDC’s unique approach through our workshops, multidisciplinary task forces, research agenda, advocacy and other initiatives.  Find out more

Integration, our guiding principle

Integrated intervention for dengue prevention is the central focus of our work. As an effective vaccine becomes available, it is necessary to pursue vector control efforts because these two strategies complement and reinforce one another. Improved scientific understanding, based on measuring the effectiveness of combining vaccine and vector control strategies, will help ensure that the necessary resources are directed to achieving sustainable dengue control.

Supporting the WHO Global Strategy 2012-2020

We support activities that contribute to the WHO target of reducing dengue deaths by 50% and dengue morbidity by 25% by 2020 and of ultimately eliminating dengue as a public health burden.

Governance

Hosted by the Mérieux Foundation, PDC is led by an independent board with Prof. Thomas W. Scott as chairman and Prof. Annelies Wilder-Smith as director. Prof. Duane Gubler was PDC’s founding chairman and continues to contribute as a member of the PDC Foundation board.

Prof. Thomas W. Scott, Distinguished Professor, University of California, Davis“Our goal is to support a globally networked alliance for the development and promotion of synergistic approaches that control dengue and other Aedes-transmitted diseases. There is a growing consensus that any one intervention will be insufficient to sustain reduction of Aedes-transmitted disease. We are working to identify which interventions work best and how they can be most effectively applied.”Prof. Thomas W. Scott
Distinguished Professor, University of California, Davis

Prof. Annelies Wilder-Smith, Professor of Infectious Disease Research, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore; Institute of Public Health, University of Heidelberg; Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, University of Umea“The Zika public health emergency and the threat of yellow fever’s global spread, in addition to the resurgence of dengue and chikungunya, constitute a wake-up call for governments, academia, funders and the World Health Organization to work together to strengthen programs and enhance research in Aedes-transmitted diseases.”Prof. Annelies Wilder-Smith
Professor of Infectious Disease Research, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore; Institute of Public Health, University of Heidelberg; Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, University of Umea